Naturalists after your heart, mind and belly

Forests inspire caring.  They are their own inspiration for our universal inner naturalist.  Still, education is a must when it comes to learning to leave our forests better than we found them.  The education comes in many forms, but the most powerful one is immersion in forest experiences.  Simple presence.  The deeper and longer we invest time in the forest, the more we naturally understand and appreciate the joys of leaving it better than we found it.  It’s built into our DNA to be that way.

It doesn’t have to be about altruism or nobly saving the planet.  You can leave forests better than you found them just for the fun and joy of doing it, because it’s the natural thing to do, once you let the forest inspire you.

Some special people are great catalysts for our education and inspiration.  Like who?

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Reviving Sylvabiota May 10, 2014 with help from Eckhart Tolle and Sitka National Historic Park

We’re revising and updating the Sylvabiota blog!  Generally, we will post something new only once or twice per month, after an initial flurry to kick-start participation.

Help us come back to life with your participation … even just a “Like” click is a big deal to us!  Thanks!

Now to Eckhart and Sitka!

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National Public Lands Day – Volunteer Opportunities

From the National Public Lands Day website:

What is National Public Lands Day?You can click on this photo to bring up the original which may be larger and higher quality but may also take longer to load.

National Public Lands Day (NPLD) is the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands. In 2013, the 20th Anniversary of National Public Lands Day will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28.

Join volunteers of all ages for NPLD’s 20th Anniversary. Celebrate with volunteers in your community at parks and other public lands. Visit our special #NPLD20 webpages for more details.

English: PINE FLAT LAKE, Calif. (Sept. 26, 200...

… NPLD began in 1994 with three sites and 700 volunteers. It proved to be a huge success and became a yearly tradition, typically held on the last Saturday in September. Since the first NPLD, the event has grown by leaps and bounds.

In 2012, about 175,000 volunteers worked at 2,206 sites in every state, the District of Columbia and in many U.S. territories. 2012 was the biggest NPLD in the history of the event.     Read more about it or find a site in your area.

Arizona Firefighting Hotshot Crew Takes the Heat All the Way to the End

Hotshots_USFS_page-headerFirst, some background …

To understand more about the 19 Hotshot crew members (who are not only firefighters) who lost their lives in the Arizona Yarnell Hill wildfire on June 30, 2013 we asked, “What is a hotshot crew?”  According to the U.S. Forest Service Hotshots website,

Interagency Hotshot Crews (IHC) are diverse teams of career and temporary agency employees who uphold a tradition of excellence and have solid reputations as multi-skilled professional firefighters.   Ninety crews are available for the 2001 fire season, employed by the US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, various Native American tribes,Hotshots_USFS_FAM-logo and the states of Alaska and Utah. Their physical fitness standards, training requirements, operation procedures are consistent nationwide, as outlined in the Standards for Interagency Hotshot Crew Operations. Their core values of “duty, integrity, and respect” have earned Hotshot crews an excellent reputation throughout the United States and Canada as elite teams of professional wildland firefighters.

Hotshot Crews started in Southern California in the late 1940s on the Cleveland and Angeles National Forests. The name was in reference to being in the hottest part of fires. Their specialty is wildfire suppression, but they are sometimes assigned other jobs, including search and rescue and disaster response assistance. Hotshots not busy fighting fire will also work to meet resource goals on their home units through thinning, prescribed fire implementation, habitat improvement or trail construction projects.

Hotshots_USFS_headshot… Hotshots must also participate in physical fitness and conditioning programs and pass the Work Capacity Test at the Arduous level. The Arduous level fitness test requires the individual to perform a three-mile hike with a 45 pound pack in 45 minutes.

… All crews require that personnel be available 24-hours per day, 7 days a week during the fire season, which typically last six months. Fire assignments may require IHC members to be away from home for several weeks at a time. The crews travel, primarily in the West, by truck, van or plane. To get to the more remote fire sites, crews either hike or are flown in by helicopter. Crew members pack all the water and supplies needed for work shifts that frequently exceed eight hours, and may be 12 hours or longer. Crews sleep on the ground and are lucky to get a shower every couple of days.

Most hotshot crew positions are seasonal, with employment from May through October. Employment is occasionally available during the pre- and post-season depending on weather and financing. For more information on the Hotshot program, contact the Hotshot crew you are interested in working with. For more information see the links below or contact your nearest Forest Service office.

IHC index: Map and index to crews by Geographic Area.
IHC detailed contact information, including crew addresses, superintendent’s name, phone number, e-mail link and Web site links.

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Forest Fire Prevention Spokesperson Bob Hope born May 29, 1903

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/Bob_Hope_Allan_Warren.jpg/396px-Bob_Hope_Allan_Warren.jpg

Bob Hope in 1986. Photo by Allan Warren (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Okay, so if you’re under the age of 50, maybe you’re scratching your head, wondering, “Who is Bob Hope?”  Most famously a comedian and comic actor, he was also a great fan of many sports, and a prominent golfer, who championed the game as a player and promoter.  He played in as many as 150 charity tournaments each year.

The World Golf Hall of Fame has a biographical website dedicated to Hope at http://www.bobhope.com/.  He said, “Golf is my profession. I tell jokes to pay my green fees.”  He wrote a book on his golfing life that was on the NY Times best seller list for 53 weeks.

On the website, take a trip down the memory lane of a comic legend:

Bob Hope Bio          Joke Page

    About Dolores          Entertaining Troops

So what does this iconic American have to do with forests?

See the article in the Forest History Society (FHS) archives (blog): May 29, 1903: Bob “Forest History” Hope was Born | Peeling Back the Bark, by Jamie “Mad B-Logger” Lewis.  There you can learn about Hope’s service to forest life (with historic pictures) as:

  • Bob Hope and Bing Crosby...spokesperson (with Bing Crosby) in the Advertising Council’s “The Campaign to Prevent Forest, Woods, and Range Fires in 1948″ booklet sent out to magazines and newspapers
  • an impromptu appearance with a forest fire prevention poster of Woody, an animated section of log character used in a forest industry public service campaign in the 1940’s
  • on his popular TV show in 1954 Hope hosted his guest Paul Searls, “the living Paul Bunyan” and advocate of tree farming, among other roles Searls had in the forest industry

About the FHS in their words: “The Forest History Society is a nonprofit library and archive dedicated to collecting, preserving, and disseminating forest and conservation history for all to use. The Society links the past to the future while reminding us about our important forest heritage.”

Subscribe to Peeling Back the Bark (http://fhsarchives.wordpress.com/), the official blog of the FHS for articles of interest to forest lovers.

Related article:

Green Everett Partnership Seeks Volunteer Forest Stewards

Sylvabiota:

REBLOGGED TO SYLVABIOTA.COM BECAUSE IT IS A GOOD EXAMPLE OF **VOLUNTEER FOREST STEWARDS** LEAVING FORESTS (AND OTHER HABITATS) BETTER THAN THEY FOUND THEM, IN A COOPERATIVE VENTURE BETWEEN THE EVERETT, WA. LOCAL PARKS & RECREATION DEPT AND A REGIONAL CONSERVATION ORG (FORTERRA). NOTICE THE PROGRAM FEATURES, “LEAD YOUR OWN ACTIVE, FUN PROJECT AT A PARK,” AND “NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY.” IF YOU LIVED IN EVERETT, WA., YOU’D SIGN UP, RIGHT? SO CALL YOUR LOCAL PARKS PEOPLE AND CONSERVATION ORGS AND ASK THEM TO LOOK AT THE WORK OF THE GREEN EVERETT PARTNERSHIP, GREEN CITY PARTNERSHIPS, AND FORTERRA.ORG.

Originally posted on Green City Partnerships:

The Green Everett Partnership is now recruiting volunteer Forest Stewards to implement restoration projects and lead groups of volunteers to rebuild healthy native plant communities within Everett’s forested parks and natural areas. Everett Parks NHowarth Park Group shot 01262013 Joanna Nelsoneed You!

  • Join a Team of Volunteer Leaders
  • Learn about ecological restoration
  • Lead your own active, fun project at a park
  • Get support from trained staff
  • Help other volunteers get involved
  • Impact the park’s environmental health
  • No Experience necessary.
  • All materials, training and support provided by the program.

New Forest Steward Orientation
Saturday May. 18th 9am-noon
Forest Park, Lions Hall – 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd, Everett, WA
For more information contact: greeneverett@forterra.org  or call 425-238-0065

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